Treatments For Acne Vulgaris

Donald asks…

How do i Fix my acne on my face?

Acne is under my skin, i just cant get rid of it even i tried dermalogist, proactiv, other skin care….HELP!!

admin answers:

IT IS ALL IN HERE! :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne_vulgaris

TRUST ME! REALLY GOOD INFO.
YOU WON’T REGRET CHECKING OUT THE WEB

Here is what the WEBSITE CONTAINS:

Contents:
1 SYMPTOMS
2 CAUSES OF ACNE
2.1 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT CAUSES
3 TREATMENTS
3.1 TIMELINE OF ACNE TREATMENT
3.2 AVAILABLE TREATMENTS
3.2.1 Exfoliating the skin
3.2.2 Topical Bactericidals
3.2.3 Topical antibiotics
3.2.4 Oral antibiotics
3.2.5 Hormonal treatments
3.2.6 External retinoids
3.2.7 Oral retinoids
3.2.8 Phototherapy
3.2.8.1 Blue and red light
3.2.8.2 Photodynamic therapy
3.3 Less widely used treatments
3.4 FUTURE TREATMENTS
3.5 Preferred treatments by types of acne vulgaris
4 ACNE SCARS
5 See also
6 References
7 Footnotes
8 External links

Daniel asks…

Pharmacists What is the difference between Retin A and RetinA Micro?

Is one stronger than the other?

Also is transdermal deliever through the epidermis effective?

admin answers:

Retin-A – There are three different forms of Retin-A., cream, gel and liquid. They are available in different strengths that are available from your physician. Retin-A(tretinoin) is indicated for topical application in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown, Retinis thought to loosen and expel existing acne plugs in the skin and prevent new lesions from forming. It directly attacks the primary cause of acne, the plug.

Retin-A Micro (tretinoin gel) microsphere, 0.1% – was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on February 7, 1997, for the tratment of acne vulgaris.This is the first prescription medication utilizing the Microsponge® systems technology. Where as conventional formulations of topical medications are intended to work on the outer layers of the skin; releasing their active ingredients upon application, producing a highly concentrated layer of active ingredient that is rapidly absorbed. The Microsponge® systems can prevent excessive accumulation of medication within surface layer of the skin. Thus, significantly reducing the irritation of effective medication without reducing their efficacy.

Less than one-thousandth of an inch in diameter, each Microsponge system can serve as a reservoir or a closed container to protect certain substances from degradation or absorption, and as an absorbent receptacle to collect undesirable substances. Microsponge technology of entrapment of undersirable substances is believed to contribute to the decrease in reported side effects in the Retin-A Micro system as compared to more traditional methods of delivering Tretinoin the active ingredient in Retin-A.

The novel acne treatment entraps Tretinoin in Microsponge systems and formulates them into a gel. The microspheres hold the medication in reserve, allowing the skin to absorb small amounts of tretinoin over time. Dermatologists who conducted the pivotal clinical studies believe this may be why most Retin-A Micro patients experience little or no irritation. The microspheres themselves remain on top of the skin and are easily washed off when patients shower or wash their face. Retin-A Micro also reduces the appearance of facial shine (oiliness) on the skin’s surface.

In clinical studies, the overwhelming majority of Retin-A Micro patients experienced little or no cutaneous irritation in four categories — erythema, peeling, burning/stinging, and itching – at two weeks, the typical peak irritation period for tretinoin.

Sandra asks…

What’s the difference between acne and pimples? How do I know which one I have?

admin answers:

Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all males and females during puberty; the only exception being teenage members of a few primitive isolated tribes living in Neolithic societies. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.

A pimple, zit or spot is a kind of acne, and one of the many results of excess oil getting trapped in the pores. Some of the varieties are pustules or papules. Pimples can be treated by various acne medications prescribed by a dermatologist, or purchased at a drug store with a wide variety of treatments. Recurrent or multiple pimples are termed acne.

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