Treatments For Acne Vulgaris

Donna asks…

how can you get rid of zits besides washing your face clean?

is there any kind of face wash to get rid of the zits?

admin answers:

IT IS ALL IN HERE! :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne_vulgaris

TRUST ME! REALLY GOOD INFO.
YOU WON’T REGRET CHECKING OUT THE WEB
Here is what the WEBSITE CONTAINS:

Contents:
1 SYMPTOMS
2 CAUSES OF ACNE
2.1 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT CAUSES
3 TREATMENTS
3.1 TIMELINE OF ACNE TREATMENT
3.2 AVAILABLE TREATMENTS
3.2.1 Exfoliating the skin
3.2.2 Topical Bactericidals
3.2.3 Topical antibiotics
3.2.4 Oral antibiotics
3.2.5 Hormonal treatments
3.2.6 External retinoids
3.2.7 Oral retinoids
3.2.8 Phototherapy
3.2.8.1 Blue and red light
3.2.8.2 Photodynamic therapy
3.3 Less widely used treatments
3.4 FUTURE TREATMENTS
3.5 Preferred treatments by types of acne vulgaris
4 ACNE SCARS
5 See also
6 References
7 Footnotes
8 External links

Susan asks…

I think i have rosacea my mom thinks its just acne vulgaris?

I think I have rosacea I’m seeing a derm my skin seems red all the time yet I’m constantly washing my face. My face gets red when I drink alcohol but my mom said its simply just teen acne and the redness is just irritation I have a few not to noticeable spider veins by my nose but they can be caused by sun and puberty as well!

admin answers:

Many of the same treatments are used so making a distinction between the two right now is probably not necessary. Stop all the washing as it could indeed contribute to the red and won’t help acne.

Linda asks…

How can I get rid of multiple little dotty pimples on my arm?

My arms are filled with little pimples. Is this a normal thing? I`ve been putting on lots and lots of lotion, and scrub my arms in the shower every day to get rid of these little pimples but it doens’t seem to work. The little dots are everywhere!

admin answers:

I forgot what its called, but the stuff for body acne will make it less noticeable. Its not body acne, though, but the sacrylic acid in the soap will help it.

Here, more info:

Keratosis pilaris is a harmless skin disorder that causes small, acne-like bumps. Although it isn’t serious, keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it’s difficult to treat.

Keratosis pilaris results from a buildup of protein called keratin in the openings of hair follicles in the skin. This produces small, rough patches, usually on the arms and thighs. Though quite common with young children, keratosis pilaris can occur at any age.

Many people are bothered by the goose flesh appearance of keratosis pilaris, but it doesn’t have long-term health implications and occurs in otherwise healthy people.

Keratosis pilaris usually resolves without treatment. But if you’re concerned about the appearance of your skin, your doctor can help you determine the best course of treatment, which includes self-care measures and medicated creams.

————

I Know that i’ve seen an article online about how sacrylic acid makes it less noticeable, but aparently those are eluding me right now, haha.
I’ll post them if i ever find it.

Frequency:

* In the US: Significant individual variation exists in the prominence and severity of keratosis pilaris, which affects 42% of the population. Some studies estimate that keratosis pilaris affects 50-80% of all adolescents. The disorder has a familial relationship, which is consistent with autosomal dominant transmission.

Frequency is increased, reported at 74%, in individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris. Many older reports claim an increased incidence with atopic dermatitis, but more recent studies do not demonstrate this association. Hormonal influence may occur because a high prevalence and intensity of keratosis pilaris is noted during puberty and in women with hyperandrogenism.

* Internationally: Incidence is similar to that observed in the United States.

Medical Care:

* Education and reassurance are the cornerstones of therapy for keratosis pilaris.

* The noninflamed horny papules usually remit with age and increasing time, but they are resistant to most forms of short-term therapy.

* Encourage tepid showers instead of hot baths, along with the use of mild soaps and a home humidifier.

* An emollient cream may help alleviate rough surfaces in mild cases. A topical keratolytic agent such as lactic acid, salicylic acid, or urea preparations may be beneficial in more extensive cases. Several recent reports claim good results with 2-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. Topical tretinoin therapy has also been used with varying degrees of success.

* Lesions with significant inflammation may improve with the use of medium-potency emollient-based topical steroid preparations. Inflammation is usually reduced markedly by 7 days, at which point the steroid should be discontinued.

HOPE THIS HELPED!!!

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