Treatments For Acne Vulgaris

Charles asks…

How can I get rid of a skin blemish?

I had a zit many years ago, and ever sice then, in that one spot, the skin always grows back dead.

admin answers:

IT IS ALL IN HERE! :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne_vulgaris

TRUST ME! REALLY GOOD INFO.
IT’S WORTH READING!

Here is what the WEBSITE CONTAINS:

Contents:
1 SYMPTOMS
2 CAUSES OF ACNE
2.1 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT CAUSES
3 TREATMENTS
3.1 TIMELINE OF ACNE TREATMENT
3.2 AVAILABLE TREATMENTS
3.2.1 Exfoliating the skin
3.2.2 Topical Bactericidals
3.2.3 Topical antibiotics
3.2.4 Oral antibiotics
3.2.5 Hormonal treatments
3.2.6 External retinoids
3.2.7 Oral retinoids
3.2.8 Phototherapy
3.2.8.1 Blue and red light
3.2.8.2 Photodynamic therapy
3.3 Less widely used treatments
3.4 FUTURE TREATMENTS
3.5 Preferred treatments by types of acne vulgaris
4 ACNE SCARS
5 See also
6 References
7 Footnotes
8 External links

James asks…

How do you remove a skin blemish?

Hi, I once had a pimple, and i added toothpaste on it (never again shall i do that). Then I realized there was a burn on the pimple, so i removed the burn by using aloe vera. Now the skin started pealing and underneath the pealed skin looks like a skin blemish. The skin of where the blemish is, is completely smooth although there is a color difference which is unattractive. I was just wondering how would you remove a blemish in the fastest way possible.

admin answers:

IT IS ALL IN HERE! :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne_vulgaris

TRUST ME! REALLY GOOD INFO.
YOU WON’T REGRET CHECKING OUT THE WEB
Here is what the WEBSITE CONTAINS:

Contents:
1 SYMPTOMS
2 CAUSES OF ACNE
2.1 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT CAUSES
3 TREATMENTS
3.1 TIMELINE OF ACNE TREATMENT
3.2 AVAILABLE TREATMENTS
3.2.1 Exfoliating the skin
3.2.2 Topical Bactericidals
3.2.3 Topical antibiotics
3.2.4 Oral antibiotics
3.2.5 Hormonal treatments
3.2.6 External retinoids
3.2.7 Oral retinoids
3.2.8 Phototherapy
3.2.8.1 Blue and red light
3.2.8.2 Photodynamic therapy
3.3 Less widely used treatments
3.4 FUTURE TREATMENTS
3.5 Preferred treatments by types of acne vulgaris
4 ACNE SCARS
5 See also
6 References
7 Footnotes
8 External links

Donna asks…

What’s the difference between Acne and Rosacea?

I was just wondering…

admin answers:

This question is not an easy one to answer since acne looks so much like rosacea. However, there are factors to consider when a physician diagnoses rosacea. You should know about these factors:

(1) Rosacea does not usually present itself with blackheads (comedo formations) that are seen with acne vulgaris.

(2) Acne usually presents itself with plugging of the ducts of the oil glands, resulting in blackheads and pimples on the face and sometimes also the back, shoulders or chest. Rosacea seems to be linked to the vascular network of the central facial skin and causes redness, bumps, pimples and other symptoms that rarely goes beyond the face.

(3) The age of onset, and the location of redness is a clue. Rosacea is commonly an adult disease, and is generally restricted to the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead. However, young ones have been diagnosed with rosacea. Also, one report “indicated that some people who have rosacea do not have it on their face at all, but rather on their back or elsewhere” which adds to the confusion.

(4) Rosacea is usually accompanied with frequent flushing and a persistent redness while acne vulgaris usually doesn’t present itself with flushing. However not all report frequent flushing and flush no more than the general population.

(5) Acne treatments tend to aggravate rosacea leading to a diagnosis of rosacea. Common treatments for acne such as Salicylic Acid, Glycolic Acid, Tretinoin, Retin-A Micro, Avita, Differin, Benzoyl Peroxide, Azelaic Acid, Triclosan, Acne peels, Chemical peels, Topical exfoliants, Toners, Astringents, Witch Hazel and Alcohol tend to aggravate rosacea (but not always). Rosacea sufferers have extremely sensitive skin. Therefore, when a patient doesn’t respond to acne treatment and the acne treatment aggravates the condition it may be diagnosed as rosacea.

(6) Eye symptoms are not associated with acne, so a careful examination for eye symptoms or a finding of ocular pathology will help confirm the diagnosis of rosacea. 50% of rosaceans have ocular rosacea.

(7) Unlike acne, rosacea is not driven forward by Propionibacterium , and subsequently should not be treated using acne medications. However, to add more confusion there is a theory that P. Acnes may be a potential aggravating factor in rosacea.15 But before you get excited about this, be sure to read my chapter on What Causes Rosacea?

Just to really add to the confusion it is not uncommon for acne and rosacea to co-exist. Yes, you can have acne and rosacea at the same time! You are beginning to understand the confusion, frustration, mystery, and misunderstanding that rosaceans go through.

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